The 2018 University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine Conference and Walt Rosser Day

Apr 20, 2018

|
8:00am–5:00pm

Details

Register today to the 2018 University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine Conference and Walt Rosser Day

Registration has begun for our one-day conference that is open to all faculty, residents, undergraduate and graduate students, staff, alumni and local and international friends of the University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine. 

Join your colleagues from Toronto, Canada, and from around the world, as we learn about the work we are all doing to advance family medicine.

All attendees and presenters must purchase their tickets through Eventbrite.


Please review the list of Workshops below for the morning and afternoon as you will be required to select your workshops on Eventbrite to purchase your ticket.

 

Register here on our event's Eventbrite ticket page. 
 

------------------------------

Registration Fee for This Year's Conference

The DFCM Event Committee works hard to ensure that our attendees are treated to a day of knowledge in an environment that is conducive to learning and the sharing of pertinent ideas. 

Every year when we plan this event, we value your contributions to DFCM and we take your comments into consideration. We revisit workshops, include new topics and tailor the conference's format from the feedback we have received.

Organizing events of this kind come at a cost for DFCM and these expenses accrue every year.  This year, we will be charging a nominal fee to attendees and presenters to ensure the partial recovery of costs incurred for this event. 

The registration fees will be structured as follows: 

  • Faculty Members: $50.00 + tax
  • Non-Faculty: $100.00 + tax
  • Learners (residents and MD students) / Administrative Staff: $20.00 + tax

Registration fees will be used solely to offset the cost of logistics which include catering, conference rooms, and AV. 

We encourage you to email us at dfcm.conference@utoronto.ca should you have any concerns or questions. 

 

Speakers

Keynote Speaker
The Honourable 
Dr. Carolyn Bennett
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Mandate Letter

The Honourable Dr. Carolyn Bennett was first elected to the House of Commons in 1997 and was re-elected in 2000, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2011 and 2015, representing Toronto–St. Paul’s. Prior to her election, Dr. Bennett was a family physician and a founding partner of Bedford Medical Associates in downtown Toronto. She was also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto. 

Earl Dunn Lecturer
Dr. Katherine Rouleau
Vice-Chair, Global Health and Social Accountability

Dr. Katherine Rouleau is a family physician at St-Michael's Hospital in Toronto and Vice-Chair of Global Health and Social Accountability Program in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto. 

 

Workshops

Workshops are to be selected at registration on our Eventbrite ticket page. Please ensure that you select the correct workshop on Eventbrite in the morning and the afternoon.  
 

Morning - 9:45 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Title Presenter Description
Research and Advocacy I: Oral Presentations Multiple
  1. 9:45-10:00 Sheila Dunn - Addressing Barriers to Implementation of Mifepristone Abortion Practice in Canada: A National Implementation Research Study.
  2. 10:00-10:15 Benjamin Kaasa - Barriers and Facilitators in Primary Care Follow-Up upon Hospital Discharge: Patients' and Caregivers' Perspectives.
  3. 10:15-10:30 Anita Srivastava - Buprenorphine in the emergency department (BED): a pilot RCT to address the opioid crisis.
  4. 10:30-10:45 Rami Shoucri - Family Physician Perspectives on Medical-Legal Partnership: A Cross-Sectional Survey.
  5. 10:45-11:00 Mary RumaniukImproving Cancer Screening Rates in Marginalized Populations by Using QI tools.
  6. 11:00 – 11:15 Melissa Nutik – Looking back to move forward in curriculum renewal.  A critical discourse analysis of generalism in undergraduate medical education.

 

Research and Advocacy II: How UTOPIAN is Working Michelle Greiver

The workshop will describe the current state of the University of Toronto Practice-Based Research Network. It will provide examples of how the network operates, what resources it offers to sites and physicians, and how the support from UTOPIAN is used in current projects.

Education and Scholarship I:  We are newly engaged scholars in education. Ask Us Anything! Risa Freeman This interactive workshop will introduce a panel of our clinician educators and researchers in medical education who are engaged in education scholarship projects in the DFCM. The panellists will provide short presentations on how they began their journeys into education scholarship from their positions as teachers and leaders in the DFCM. Participants will be able to ask their own questions about engaging in education scholarship projects.   Ask us anything!  
Family Doctor Leadership I:  Advancing Academic Leadership: Strategies for success

David White
Gillian Hawker
Stu Murdoch

This workshop focuses on strategies for advancing academic leadership throughout DFCM, and more broadly our discipline. There will be an emphasis on the importance of teams and broad leadership development in a highly distributed academic enterprise. The format will be interactive, combining research findings and practical examples to identify principles and effective practices. 
Global Health & Social Accountability I:  Caring in the context of adverse social determinants of health:  Working together to do better! Katherine Rouleau

This workshop seeks to answer the question: If the Central DFCM, as a resource to the local, national and international community, were to meaningfully contribute to addressing the health needs of those facing adverse social determinants of health (ASDOH), what should we do together?

Local and international promising practices in the care of those affected by ASDOH will be presented. We will then engage participants in identifying 1-3 concrete department-wide projects to advance this work through the integration of education, research, QI, clinical care and advocacy. We need those of you prepared to share your experience, expertise, passion, creativity and imagination.

Rashes that Kill: Emergency Dermatology George Porfiris

Develop an approach to the unknown rash using the morphologic features of the rash. Come up with red flags for rashes. Using cases, going through the differential and treatment of various dermatological conditions

Evidence-Based Medical Cannabis Opioid Reduction Program:  MCORP Kevin Rod Opioid crisis is taking lives and the search for solutions continues. Medical Cannabis has been used now for a few years and the College of Family Physicians of Canada has provided a framework for prescribing. There is some evidence available that proper use of medical cannabis may be helpful in opioid dose reduction however most of opioid reduction programs would need a mental health or wellness component as well. MCORP combines the opioid reduction based on the last opioid guideline recommendations, CFPC guided medical cannabis recommendations and the use of a novel online mental wellness support technology to assist opioid reduction. 
Making Patient Care Safer - Teaching Tips for Faculty Working with Residents Sam Tirkos 
Stephanie Godard
Roarke Copeland
Margarita Antoniades,
Thuy-Nga Pham
Open Patient Safety discussions and systematic Incident Analysis has yet to be fully adopted into primary care.  At the Toronto East Health Network and St Micheal's Hospital teaching clinics, we launched an incident analysis system with our learners and developed a case-based faculty development workshop on how to have meaningful conversations about patient safety.  

The aim is to normalize incident analysis from a system perspective to create meaningful dialogue around harmful or near-miss events for family medicine trainees and faculty, to ultimately improve patient care.  By adopting a systematic and consistent process across all teaching clinics, the topic of patient safety and incident analysis should become engrained in medical education to promote a culture of safety.
Co-designing the Patient Medical Home in Your Neighbourhood Jocelyn Charles
Yoel Abells
Curtis Handford
Pauline Pariser
Our department strives to advance the discipline of family medicine and improve health for our diverse and underserved communities both locally and globally. Toronto is a city of very diverse economic and cultural neighbourhoods with variable access to primary care, particularly comprehensive primary care. Six members of our department are working with primary care physicians throughout Toronto to engage as many primary care providers as possible and together co-design better integrated primary care that is responsive to the needs of the local populations and ensures equitable access to care and services close to home. Our goal is to achieve our CFPC's vision of a sustainable future for health care in Canada through strong primary care using the internationally recognized Patient's Medical Home (PMH) model. This workshop will engage participants in their local geographic practice areas to inform this co-design process using detailed Toronto neighbourhood data.
Portraying Social Identities in the Medical Curriculum and Clinical Teaching Elise Jackson Inna Berditchevskaia  
Jana Lazor
Rebecca Stoller
Danielle Manis
Mariam Naguib
Kaiwen Song
In response to concerns about how various social identities are portrayed in the medical curriculum, a group of MD students at the University of Toronto, along with Office of Faculty Development, MD Program, created a resource to address this issue. A novel primer was designed to help medical educators and learners consider the portrayal of different social identities in their teaching.
Office Emergencies:  Are you Ready? Gurpreet Mand
Monica Nijhawan
Joanne Maznick
Eva Chen
This will be a 90-minute workshop on best practices for managing office emergencies.  The current guidelines for recommendations on required office supplies/equipment will be reviewed.  Participants will have the opportunity to work in groups to work through 3-4 office emergency scenarios (examples: anaphylaxis, cardiac arrest, chest pain and seizures).   Various teaching methods will be utilized to review Basic Life Support methods in the ambulatory setting.  This may include: group discussion, practical skills with simulation, and review of medications and AED use.  The focus will be process-based learning in an Interprofessional environment.  This is not a BLS certificate program.
The ABC's by XYZ: Intergenerational Teaching and Learning Vanessa Rambihar
Erin Bearss
Milena Forte

This interactive workshop will feature a dynamic panel of faculty spanning Boomers, Gen X, Y (and maybe Z). We will focus on the most effective ways to promote effective Teaching and Learning in Intergenerational learning environments with a focus on Millenial learners and faculty.

Mind-Body Fitness Basics for the Absolute Beginner Sarah Kim This workshop is aimed at individuals with sedentary jobs, little time and perhaps confidence to attend fitness classes or go to the gym.  Participants will be led through a series of exercises that can easily be integrated into any day.  This program is accessible and it is encouraged to be shared with patients.  Participants can expect to leave feeling calmer, refocused and refreshed.  Learn simple steps to achieving improved fitness of both body and mind.  The ultimate goal is to get everyone moving more, reducing stress and gaining greater comfort to incorporate regular exercise and mindfulness as a part of daily life.
A Case-Based Approach to Cancer Screening and Surveillance in Ontario Lisa Del Giudice
Ed Kucharski 
Using a case-based approach, this workshop will provide evidence-based updates on cancer screening as well as screening/surveillance after an abnormal screening result.  Updates for cancer screening guidelines and upcoming changes in screening processes in Ontario will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on fecal immunochemical testing, human papilloma virus testing, high-risk low dose CT for lung cancer and indications for annual mammography. Each case will start with routine screening and follow scenarios through an abnormal screening result. Guidelines for ongoing surveillance in primary care after work-up of an abnormal result (e.g. post-colposcopy, post-colonoscopy) will be presented. Updated evidence will be used to clarify inconsistencies in current practices.

 

Afternoon - 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Title Presenter Description
Research and Advocacy III: Oral Presentations Multiple
  1. 2:30-2:45 Tony D'Urzo - Lung function and clinical features among patients with and without airway hyper-reactivity and symptoms compatible with asthma in primary care.
  2. 2:45-3:00 Anne Rucchetto - Evaluating the implementation and impact of an online tool used within primary care to improve the income security of patients with complex health and social needs in Ontario and Manitoba.
  3. 3:00-3:15 Rajesh Girdhari - How and why do DFCM physicians use email with patients?
  4. 3:15-3:30 Rosemarie Lall - Proactive and opportunistic management of diabetics: Improving Care by Redesigning Clinic Flow.
  5. 3:30-3:45 Lisa DelGiudice – A Pilot Study to INTEGRATE Palliative Care Skills Into Primary Care Practice.
  6. 3:45-4:00 Rose Wang – Evaluating the Income Security Health Promotion service: A survey on patient experience.
Research and Advocacy IV: Oral Presentations Multiple
  1. 2:30-2:45 Peter Selby - The COMBAT Study: Personalized patient alerts and care pathways to prompt prevention interventions for combined alcohol and tobacco users in primary care.
  2. 2:45-3:00 Mary Ann O'Brien - BETTER Health Durham: Community engagement in a cluster RCT of a prevention practitioner intervention in low-income neighbourhoods.
  3. 3:00-3:15 Payal Agarwal - Practical Apps: A Framework to Assess the Quality of Mobile Health Apps for Chronic Disease Management.
  4. 3:15-3:30 Deanna Telner - Exploring the primary care experiences of patients with eating disorders: a thematic analysis.
  5. 3:30-3:45 Kim Radford Addressing Precarious Employment in Family Medicine: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study.
  6. 3:45-4:00 Navsheer Toor – A qualitative study to determine how Family Medicine residents experience house calls during postgraduate training
Family Doctor Leadership II:  Academic Leadership: equity, diversity, and mentorship David White
Lisa Robinson
James Owen
Sharon Straus
This workshop focuses on advancing academic leadership by promoting equity and diversity among our faculty, with an emphasis on the role of mentorship. The format will be interactive, combining research findings and practical examples to identify principles and effective practices. 
Global Health & Social Accountability II:  

Taking steps towards improving Indigenous Health: Knowledge and Reflection

Katherine Rouleau

Our individual and collective awareness of the scandalous health disparities that prevail between the indigenous and general Canadian population have increased since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. While the number of indigenous patients in our practices may not be high, it is increasingly recognized that a deeper understanding of the underpinnings of the current adverse health outcomes in indigenous communities, for all Canadians and particularly for health providers, is needed in order to enable healing and the attainment of optimal health for all.

In this workshop, we will work with Indigenous leaders and allies to deepen our knowledge and understanding of the socio-cultural and political issues that have shaped the current state of indigenous health in Canada.  We will reflect on how we may engage further individually and as a Department.

How Do I Become an Assistant Professor? Marie Leverman
Tony D'Urzo
Naz Lalani
Are you interested (or even curious) about promotion from Lecturer to Assistant Professor? This workshop will outline the steps, process and criteria for promotion. We will assess your body of work around teaching effectiveness, creative professional activity or research in order to match the criteria for promotion. This workshop will use a combination of methods including interactive lecture, small group discussion, four informational videos and individual assessment. Each participant will leave with fundamental information that they can immediately apply to preparing their own application.
Teaching the New Standards and Tools for OA Management Julia Alleyne Osteoarthritis is an overlooked chronic condition that affects many of our patients and limits their quality of life. There are game-changing initiatives across the country that are setting best practice standards aimed at primary care.  The College of Family Physicians released the OA tool in 2017 and Health Quality Ontario is releasing new quality standards in the Spring of 2018. This workshop will provide educators with an overview for integrating practical assessment and appropriate management into resident teaching through role modelling.The use of clinical decision making will be highlighted as a teaching strategy that can be incorporated into patient visits regardless of the primary reason for care. The workshop will be divided into 3 sections; Making standards and guidelines simple, Role modelling the OA tool & Case-based clinical-decision in complex patients. Dr. Julia Alleyne will be sharing her insights as the clinical lead on the OA Tool and co-chair of the HQO standards. 
Opioid Crisis Simulation Workshop Edward Xie Jennifer Hulm
Hasan Sheik
Rabia Ban
Thomas Piott

Opioid abuse is widespread and commonly managed by family physicians. The health and social impacts are profound and have reached "crisis level" with rising mortality from overdoses. Within this simulation workshop, participants will assume stakeholder roles to address individual and systemic policy responses to the opioid crisis. 

The goal of this simulation is for participants to collaboratively achieve consensus on resource allocation and policy response to the opioid crisis in a mid-sized city. Specific learning objectives aim to build capacity in advocacy, health policy and planning.

This workshop introduces a novel method of simulation education for public health and primary care that is supported by evidence from other fields. It addresses the CanMEDS-FM roles of family medicine expert, communicator, collaborator, leader, and health advocate.
 

Public Health and Family Medicine – Systems and Synergies Barry Pakes
Ross Upshur
Onye Nnorom 
Alex Summers        
This workshop will provide participants with an understanding of the roles of various levels of the public health system and how these interfaces and are relevant to family medicine practice, research and education. The presenters will describe and explore overlapping competencies and synergies between public health and family medicine. During the second half of the workshop participants will apply public health frameworks and tools to address a population-level family medicine problem and identify areas in which primary care can work with public health agencies to improve communication, integration, and complementarity.
Dermoscopy - A skin triage tool for Family Physicians Darshini Persaude The Triage Amalgamated Dermoscopic Algorithm (TADA) utilizes Dermoscopy to triage skin lesions for biopsy or specialist referral. Several studies have demonstrated that dermoscopy can improve the primary care providers’ ability to accurately identify malignant skin lesions. The goal of this workshop is to provide a framework for further teaching and learning of Dermoscopy in Family Medicine.
Fostering the New Revolution in Canadian Medical Education "A Humanities Toolkit." How to Teach Family Medical Learners Using Visual Arts, Literary Texts and Film Clips Jessica Munro There is a growing body of research that suggests that exposing medical trainees to the humanities (including literature, film, poetry, and visual arts) fosters enhanced critical reflection and empathy in physician-patient encounters. Furthermore, such exposure celebrates the subjective and emotional facets of learning alongside more conventional scientific/evidence-based approaches.
Implementing mifepristone medical abortion into academic family medicine practice Sarah Warden
Inna Genkin
Sheila Dunn 
Approximately one-third of Canadian women seek abortion care during their lifetime. The recent approval of mifepristone in Canada presents an opportunity for primary care practitioners to extend their reproductive health services to include medical abortion care. Reproductive health training during residency is associated with subsequent intention to provide services. This workshop will review the pharmacology and action of mifepristone/misoprostol, the process of medical abortion and practice-based considerations for successful integration of mifepristone abortion in academic family practice. Case-based discussions will illustrate management of common questions and concerns.
Supporting Safe Opioid Prescribing in a Community Teaching Clinic Maya Maliakkal
Jadie Stone
A safe opioid prescribing education initiative at Markham FMTU was developed and included: one-on-one mentoring, implementing EMR tools, an education seminar, providing a “prescriber report card” based on chart review data and making available self-directed learning resources. Together with chart review data, an approach to safe prescribing was discussed with all clinic prescribers which emphasized medication reconciliation, greater use of signed opioid agreement and urine drug screening, and continuity of care. Effectiveness of the education intervention will also be discussed.
Value proposition design in health service development Onil Bhattacharyya
Vess Stamenova
Kate Mossman 
Digital health solutions have enormous promise but, in practice, do not often achieve the expected results. These tools should enable changes to the model of care, but this is largely dependent on the context and the specific needs of the patients, healthcare professionals, and administrators which are often not well understood before implementation. Identifying how a digital health solution brings value to various users is best done through iterative testing in the context of implementation. Value proposition design is a methodology used by startup companies to understand how a business solution addresses the needs of customers and is well suited to the development of new models of care. 
An Introduction to Community and System Level Advocacy Samantha Green It is well recognized that social determinants such as race, income, and ability are predominant drivers of health inequities. Family physicians are uniquely positioned to identify and respond to these inequities with a trusted voice through advocacy. Family physicians regularly act as health advocates for individual patients; yet this CanMEDS-FM role also bestows a responsibility to advocate for changes that will promote the health of communities, especially those that are more vulnerable. These broader advocacy efforts aimed at systems can seem outside the scope of physician training since medical school and residency curricula are inconsistent and often inadequate. In this session, participants will explore the role of meso- and macro-level advocacy in family medicine using specific case examples. Participants will gain tangible tools for embarking on community- and system-level advocacy. Participants will leave with a framework for addressing health inequities in their communities.

Join your colleagues from Toronto, Canada, and from around the world, as we learn about the work we are all doing to advance family medicine. 

Please contact us at dfcm.conference@utoronto.ca, should you have any questions. 


The official hashtag for the conference is #DFCM2018.

 

Location

Beanfield Centre
105 Princes' Blvd
Toronto
M6K 3C3

Contact

dfcm.conference@utoronto.ca
2018-04-20 12:00:00 2018-04-20 21:00:00 UTC The 2018 University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine Conference and Walt Rosser Day Register today to the 2018 University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine Conference and Walt Rosser Day Registration has begun for our one-day conference that is open to all faculty, residents, undergraduate and graduate students, staff, alumni and local and international friends of the University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine.  Join your colleagues from Toronto, Canada, and from around the world, as we learn about the work we are all doing to advance family medicine. All attendees and presenters must purchase their tickets through Eventbrite. Please review the list of Workshops below for the morning and afternoon as you will be required to select your workshops on Eventbrite to purchase your ticket.   Register here on our event's Eventbrite ticket page.   ------------------------------ Registration Fee for This Year's Conference The DFCM Event Committee works hard to ensure that our attendees are treated to a day of knowledge in an environment that is conducive to learning and the sharing of pertinent ideas. Every year when we plan this event, we value your contributions to DFCM and we take your comments into consideration. We revisit workshops, include new topics and tailor the conference's format from the feedback we have received.Organizing events of this kind come at a cost for DFCM and these expenses accrue every year.  This year, we will be charging a nominal fee to attendees and presenters to ensure the partial recovery of costs incurred for this event. The registration fees will be structured as follows:  Faculty Members: $50.00 + tax Non-Faculty: $100.00 + tax Learners (residents and MD students) / Administrative Staff: $20.00 + tax Registration fees will be used solely to offset the cost of logistics which include catering, conference rooms, and AV.  We encourage you to email us at dfcm.conference@utoronto.ca should you have any concerns or questions.    Speakers Keynote SpeakerThe Honourable Dr. Carolyn BennettMinister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Mandate Letter The Honourable Dr. Carolyn Bennett was first elected to the House of Commons in 1997 and was re-elected in 2000, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2011 and 2015, representing Toronto–St. Paul’s. Prior to her election, Dr. Bennett was a family physician and a founding partner of Bedford Medical Associates in downtown Toronto. She was also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto.  Katherine Rouleau (2) Earl Dunn LecturerDr. Katherine RouleauVice-Chair, Global Health and Social AccountabilityDr. Katherine Rouleau is a family physician at St-Michael's Hospital in Toronto and Vice-Chair of Global Health and Social Accountability Program in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto.    Workshops Workshops are to be selected at registration on our Eventbrite ticket page. Please ensure that you select the correct workshop on Eventbrite in the morning and the afternoon.    Morning - 9:45 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. Title Presenter Description Research and Advocacy I: Oral Presentations Multiple 9:45-10:00 Sheila Dunn - Addressing Barriers to Implementation of Mifepristone Abortion Practice in Canada: A National Implementation Research Study. 10:00-10:15 Benjamin Kaasa - Barriers and Facilitators in Primary Care Follow-Up upon Hospital Discharge: Patients' and Caregivers' Perspectives. 10:15-10:30 Anita Srivastava - Buprenorphine in the emergency department (BED): a pilot RCT to address the opioid crisis. 10:30-10:45 Rami Shoucri - Family Physician Perspectives on Medical-Legal Partnership: A Cross-Sectional Survey. 10:45-11:00 Mary Rumaniuk – Improving Cancer Screening Rates in Marginalized Populations by Using QI tools. 11:00 – 11:15 Melissa Nutik – Looking back to move forward in curriculum renewal.  A critical discourse analysis of generalism in undergraduate medical education.   Research and Advocacy II: How UTOPIAN is Working Michelle Greiver The workshop will describe the current state of the University of Toronto Practice-Based Research Network. It will provide examples of how the network operates, what resources it offers to sites and physicians, and how the support from UTOPIAN is used in current projects. Education and Scholarship I:  We are newly engaged scholars in education. Ask Us Anything! Risa Freeman This interactive workshop will introduce a panel of our clinician educators and researchers in medical education who are engaged in education scholarship projects in the DFCM. The panellists will provide short presentations on how they began their journeys into education scholarship from their positions as teachers and leaders in the DFCM. Participants will be able to ask their own questions about engaging in education scholarship projects.   Ask us anything!   Family Doctor Leadership I:  Advancing Academic Leadership: Strategies for success David WhiteGillian HawkerStu Murdoch This workshop focuses on strategies for advancing academic leadership throughout DFCM, and more broadly our discipline. There will be an emphasis on the importance of teams and broad leadership development in a highly distributed academic enterprise. The format will be interactive, combining research findings and practical examples to identify principles and effective practices.  Global Health & Social Accountability I:  Caring in the context of adverse social determinants of health:  Working together to do better! Katherine Rouleau This workshop seeks to answer the question: If the Central DFCM, as a resource to the local, national and international community, were to meaningfully contribute to addressing the health needs of those facing adverse social determinants of health (ASDOH), what should we do together? Local and international promising practices in the care of those affected by ASDOH will be presented. We will then engage participants in identifying 1-3 concrete department-wide projects to advance this work through the integration of education, research, QI, clinical care and advocacy. We need those of you prepared to share your experience, expertise, passion, creativity and imagination. Rashes that Kill: Emergency Dermatology George Porfiris Develop an approach to the unknown rash using the morphologic features of the rash. Come up with red flags for rashes. Using cases, going through the differential and treatment of various dermatological conditions Evidence-Based Medical Cannabis Opioid Reduction Program:  MCORP Kevin Rod Opioid crisis is taking lives and the search for solutions continues. Medical Cannabis has been used now for a few years and the College of Family Physicians of Canada has provided a framework for prescribing. There is some evidence available that proper use of medical cannabis may be helpful in opioid dose reduction however most of opioid reduction programs would need a mental health or wellness component as well. MCORP combines the opioid reduction based on the last opioid guideline recommendations, CFPC guided medical cannabis recommendations and the use of a novel online mental wellness support technology to assist opioid reduction.  Making Patient Care Safer - Teaching Tips for Faculty Working with Residents Sam Tirkos Stephanie GodardRoarke CopelandMargarita Antoniades,Thuy-Nga Pham Open Patient Safety discussions and systematic Incident Analysis has yet to be fully adopted into primary care.  At the Toronto East Health Network and St Micheal's Hospital teaching clinics, we launched an incident analysis system with our learners and developed a case-based faculty development workshop on how to have meaningful conversations about patient safety.  The aim is to normalize incident analysis from a system perspective to create meaningful dialogue around harmful or near-miss events for family medicine trainees and faculty, to ultimately improve patient care.  By adopting a systematic and consistent process across all teaching clinics, the topic of patient safety and incident analysis should become engrained in medical education to promote a culture of safety. Co-designing the Patient Medical Home in Your Neighbourhood Jocelyn CharlesYoel AbellsCurtis HandfordPauline Pariser Our department strives to advance the discipline of family medicine and improve health for our diverse and underserved communities both locally and globally. Toronto is a city of very diverse economic and cultural neighbourhoods with variable access to primary care, particularly comprehensive primary care. Six members of our department are working with primary care physicians throughout Toronto to engage as many primary care providers as possible and together co-design better integrated primary care that is responsive to the needs of the local populations and ensures equitable access to care and services close to home. Our goal is to achieve our CFPC's vision of a sustainable future for health care in Canada through strong primary care using the internationally recognized Patient's Medical Home (PMH) model. This workshop will engage participants in their local geographic practice areas to inform this co-design process using detailed Toronto neighbourhood data. Portraying Social Identities in the Medical Curriculum and Clinical Teaching Elise Jackson Inna Berditchevskaia  Jana LazorRebecca StollerDanielle ManisMariam NaguibKaiwen Song In response to concerns about how various social identities are portrayed in the medical curriculum, a group of MD students at the University of Toronto, along with Office of Faculty Development, MD Program, created a resource to address this issue. A novel primer was designed to help medical educators and learners consider the portrayal of different social identities in their teaching. Office Emergencies:  Are you Ready? Gurpreet MandMonica NijhawanJoanne MaznickEva Chen This will be a 90-minute workshop on best practices for managing office emergencies.  The current guidelines for recommendations on required office supplies/equipment will be reviewed.  Participants will have the opportunity to work in groups to work through 3-4 office emergency scenarios (examples: anaphylaxis, cardiac arrest, chest pain and seizures).   Various teaching methods will be utilized to review Basic Life Support methods in the ambulatory setting.  This may include: group discussion, practical skills with simulation, and review of medications and AED use.  The focus will be process-based learning in an Interprofessional environment.  This is not a BLS certificate program. The ABC's by XYZ: Intergenerational Teaching and Learning Vanessa RambiharErin BearssMilena Forte This interactive workshop will feature a dynamic panel of faculty spanning Boomers, Gen X, Y (and maybe Z). We will focus on the most effective ways to promote effective Teaching and Learning in Intergenerational learning environments with a focus on Millenial learners and faculty. Mind-Body Fitness Basics for the Absolute Beginner Sarah Kim This workshop is aimed at individuals with sedentary jobs, little time and perhaps confidence to attend fitness classes or go to the gym.  Participants will be led through a series of exercises that can easily be integrated into any day.  This program is accessible and it is encouraged to be shared with patients.  Participants can expect to leave feeling calmer, refocused and refreshed.  Learn simple steps to achieving improved fitness of both body and mind.  The ultimate goal is to get everyone moving more, reducing stress and gaining greater comfort to incorporate regular exercise and mindfulness as a part of daily life. A Case-Based Approach to Cancer Screening and Surveillance in Ontario Lisa Del GiudiceEd Kucharski  Using a case-based approach, this workshop will provide evidence-based updates on cancer screening as well as screening/surveillance after an abnormal screening result.  Updates for cancer screening guidelines and upcoming changes in screening processes in Ontario will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on fecal immunochemical testing, human papilloma virus testing, high-risk low dose CT for lung cancer and indications for annual mammography. Each case will start with routine screening and follow scenarios through an abnormal screening result. Guidelines for ongoing surveillance in primary care after work-up of an abnormal result (e.g. post-colposcopy, post-colonoscopy) will be presented. Updated evidence will be used to clarify inconsistencies in current practices.   Afternoon - 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Title Presenter Description Research and Advocacy III: Oral Presentations Multiple 2:30-2:45 Tony D'Urzo - Lung function and clinical features among patients with and without airway hyper-reactivity and symptoms compatible with asthma in primary care. 2:45-3:00 Anne Rucchetto - Evaluating the implementation and impact of an online tool used within primary care to improve the income security of patients with complex health and social needs in Ontario and Manitoba. 3:00-3:15 Rajesh Girdhari - How and why do DFCM physicians use email with patients? 3:15-3:30 Rosemarie Lall - Proactive and opportunistic management of diabetics: Improving Care by Redesigning Clinic Flow. 3:30-3:45 Lisa DelGiudice – A Pilot Study to INTEGRATE Palliative Care Skills Into Primary Care Practice. 3:45-4:00 Rose Wang – Evaluating the Income Security Health Promotion service: A survey on patient experience. Research and Advocacy IV: Oral Presentations Multiple 2:30-2:45 Peter Selby - The COMBAT Study: Personalized patient alerts and care pathways to prompt prevention interventions for combined alcohol and tobacco users in primary care. 2:45-3:00 Mary Ann O'Brien - BETTER Health Durham: Community engagement in a cluster RCT of a prevention practitioner intervention in low-income neighbourhoods. 3:00-3:15 Payal Agarwal - Practical Apps: A Framework to Assess the Quality of Mobile Health Apps for Chronic Disease Management. 3:15-3:30 Deanna Telner - Exploring the primary care experiences of patients with eating disorders: a thematic analysis. 3:30-3:45 Kim Radford – Addressing Precarious Employment in Family Medicine: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study. 3:45-4:00 Navsheer Toor – A qualitative study to determine how Family Medicine residents experience house calls during postgraduate training Family Doctor Leadership II:  Academic Leadership: equity, diversity, and mentorship David WhiteLisa RobinsonJames OwenSharon Straus This workshop focuses on advancing academic leadership by promoting equity and diversity among our faculty, with an emphasis on the role of mentorship. The format will be interactive, combining research findings and practical examples to identify principles and effective practices.  Global Health & Social Accountability II:   Taking steps towards improving Indigenous Health: Knowledge and Reflection Katherine Rouleau Our individual and collective awareness of the scandalous health disparities that prevail between the indigenous and general Canadian population have increased since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. While the number of indigenous patients in our practices may not be high, it is increasingly recognized that a deeper understanding of the underpinnings of the current adverse health outcomes in indigenous communities, for all Canadians and particularly for health providers, is needed in order to enable healing and the attainment of optimal health for all. In this workshop, we will work with Indigenous leaders and allies to deepen our knowledge and understanding of the socio-cultural and political issues that have shaped the current state of indigenous health in Canada.  We will reflect on how we may engage further individually and as a Department. How Do I Become an Assistant Professor? Marie LevermanTony D'UrzoNaz Lalani Are you interested (or even curious) about promotion from Lecturer to Assistant Professor? This workshop will outline the steps, process and criteria for promotion. We will assess your body of work around teaching effectiveness, creative professional activity or research in order to match the criteria for promotion. This workshop will use a combination of methods including interactive lecture, small group discussion, four informational videos and individual assessment. Each participant will leave with fundamental information that they can immediately apply to preparing their own application. Teaching the New Standards and Tools for OA Management Julia Alleyne Osteoarthritis is an overlooked chronic condition that affects many of our patients and limits their quality of life. There are game-changing initiatives across the country that are setting best practice standards aimed at primary care.  The College of Family Physicians released the OA tool in 2017 and Health Quality Ontario is releasing new quality standards in the Spring of 2018. This workshop will provide educators with an overview for integrating practical assessment and appropriate management into resident teaching through role modelling.The use of clinical decision making will be highlighted as a teaching strategy that can be incorporated into patient visits regardless of the primary reason for care. The workshop will be divided into 3 sections; Making standards and guidelines simple, Role modelling the OA tool & Case-based clinical-decision in complex patients. Dr. Julia Alleyne will be sharing her insights as the clinical lead on the OA Tool and co-chair of the HQO standards.  Opioid Crisis Simulation Workshop Edward Xie Jennifer HulmHasan SheikRabia BanThomas Piott Opioid abuse is widespread and commonly managed by family physicians. The health and social impacts are profound and have reached "crisis level" with rising mortality from overdoses. Within this simulation workshop, participants will assume stakeholder roles to address individual and systemic policy responses to the opioid crisis.  The goal of this simulation is for participants to collaboratively achieve consensus on resource allocation and policy response to the opioid crisis in a mid-sized city. Specific learning objectives aim to build capacity in advocacy, health policy and planning. This workshop introduces a novel method of simulation education for public health and primary care that is supported by evidence from other fields. It addresses the CanMEDS-FM roles of family medicine expert, communicator, collaborator, leader, and health advocate.  Public Health and Family Medicine – Systems and Synergies Barry PakesRoss UpshurOnye Nnorom Alex Summers         This workshop will provide participants with an understanding of the roles of various levels of the public health system and how these interfaces and are relevant to family medicine practice, research and education. The presenters will describe and explore overlapping competencies and synergies between public health and family medicine. During the second half of the workshop participants will apply public health frameworks and tools to address a population-level family medicine problem and identify areas in which primary care can work with public health agencies to improve communication, integration, and complementarity. Dermoscopy - A skin triage tool for Family Physicians Darshini Persaude The Triage Amalgamated Dermoscopic Algorithm (TADA) utilizes Dermoscopy to triage skin lesions for biopsy or specialist referral. Several studies have demonstrated that dermoscopy can improve the primary care providers’ ability to accurately identify malignant skin lesions. The goal of this workshop is to provide a framework for further teaching and learning of Dermoscopy in Family Medicine. Fostering the New Revolution in Canadian Medical Education "A Humanities Toolkit." How to Teach Family Medical Learners Using Visual Arts, Literary Texts and Film Clips Jessica Munro There is a growing body of research that suggests that exposing medical trainees to the humanities (including literature, film, poetry, and visual arts) fosters enhanced critical reflection and empathy in physician-patient encounters. Furthermore, such exposure celebrates the subjective and emotional facets of learning alongside more conventional scientific/evidence-based approaches. Implementing mifepristone medical abortion into academic family medicine practice Sarah WardenInna GenkinSheila Dunn  Approximately one-third of Canadian women seek abortion care during their lifetime. The recent approval of mifepristone in Canada presents an opportunity for primary care practitioners to extend their reproductive health services to include medical abortion care. Reproductive health training during residency is associated with subsequent intention to provide services. This workshop will review the pharmacology and action of mifepristone/misoprostol, the process of medical abortion and practice-based considerations for successful integration of mifepristone abortion in academic family practice. Case-based discussions will illustrate management of common questions and concerns. Supporting Safe Opioid Prescribing in a Community Teaching Clinic Maya MaliakkalJadie Stone A safe opioid prescribing education initiative at Markham FMTU was developed and included: one-on-one mentoring, implementing EMR tools, an education seminar, providing a “prescriber report card” based on chart review data and making available self-directed learning resources. Together with chart review data, an approach to safe prescribing was discussed with all clinic prescribers which emphasized medication reconciliation, greater use of signed opioid agreement and urine drug screening, and continuity of care. Effectiveness of the education intervention will also be discussed. Value proposition design in health service development Onil BhattacharyyaVess StamenovaKate Mossman  Digital health solutions have enormous promise but, in practice, do not often achieve the expected results. These tools should enable changes to the model of care, but this is largely dependent on the context and the specific needs of the patients, healthcare professionals, and administrators which are often not well understood before implementation. Identifying how a digital health solution brings value to various users is best done through iterative testing in the context of implementation. Value proposition design is a methodology used by startup companies to understand how a business solution addresses the needs of customers and is well suited to the development of new models of care.  An Introduction to Community and System Level Advocacy Samantha Green It is well recognized that social determinants such as race, income, and ability are predominant drivers of health inequities. Family physicians are uniquely positioned to identify and respond to these inequities with a trusted voice through advocacy. Family physicians regularly act as health advocates for individual patients; yet this CanMEDS-FM role also bestows a responsibility to advocate for changes that will promote the health of communities, especially those that are more vulnerable. These broader advocacy efforts aimed at systems can seem outside the scope of physician training since medical school and residency curricula are inconsistent and often inadequate. In this session, participants will explore the role of meso- and macro-level advocacy in family medicine using specific case examples. Participants will gain tangible tools for embarking on community- and system-level advocacy. Participants will leave with a framework for addressing health inequities in their communities. Join your colleagues from Toronto, Canada, and from around the world, as we learn about the work we are all doing to advance family medicine. Please contact us at dfcm.conference@utoronto.ca, should you have any questions.  The official hashtag for the conference is #DFCM2018.   105 Princes' Blvd - Beanfield Centre discovery.commons@utoronto.ca
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